constitution opinion essay

eyewear business plan ideas

Skip to main content. Location New York, United States. Salary Salary Not Specified. Posted Jul 13,

Constitution opinion essay writing a research paper on a country

Constitution opinion essay

Constitution would think about our current presidency, Congress, courts, and media, and how we can resurrect Madisonian values of constitutionalism, public reason, and the rule of law in a polarized age. Michael Gerhardt and Jeffrey Rosen take a look at the scholars participating in this essay series and how they offer insights on the Madisonian Constitution, the likely developments undermining its objectives, and possible solutions for its restoration. Saikrisha Prakash argues that the Constitutional Convention created a Presidency that was stronger than is commonly recognized today, but that events over the following two centuries have made the Presidency stronger still, and have erased most of the Constitution's key limits on presidential power.

Sean Wilentz explores the drama around the original Electoral College in the elections of and , leading to the adoption of the Twelfth Amendment in , to show that James Madison and the other Framers were just as familiar with the rough-and-tumble of presidential politics as we are today.

Sarah Binder says that, while Madison's vision for Congress has been a sweeping success throughout American history, increased political polarization has weakened Congress and made it harder for it to play its intended constitutional role.

Daniel Stid considers the different factors, chiefly political polarization, that have led Congress to abdicate so many of its powers to the President, and explores a number of reforms that could help restore the Congress that Madison envisioned. Michael Stokes Paulsen discusses Madison's views toward constitutional interpretation, which he viewed as equally the province of each branch of government, not just the courts, and believed must follow the text of the Constitution as originally understood.

Jack Rakove explores one of Madison's ideas that was not adopted by the Constitutional Convention: a "council of revision" including the President and the Supreme Court that would address constitutional problems with laws passed by Congress. Colleen Sheehan contends that, while Madison did seek to prevent "tyranny of the majority," he also wanted to empower national majorities to govern wisely.

But advances in technology and increased polarization have undermined the "deliberative Republic" Madison envisioned. Nevertheless, a suitable provision for amendment is considered to be a part of the very nature of the Constitution. A democratic Constitution has to be particularly responsive to changing conditions, since. The some of the enumerated powers include the power to coin money, the commerce clause, and the taxing and spending clause.

These powers provide the Government with a foundation of. The Constitution created a government of limited and expressed powers. The Constitution is the supreme law of the land. It was written to make good government and laws, and to provide freedom to all, thus creating a healthy nations.

The Articles of the Constitution express the roles and duties each part of the government has. It also separates power between the federal and state governments. The founding fathers knew that as time changes, so do the needs of society and the government needs to address.

It is the basis on which all other laws are made and enforced. We can all also that Constitution is mother of all other laws which draws their validity from it. It also sets the outline and authority and limitation for all laws farmed by the legislative body of any country. Making of Constitution is one thing and amending it another. Amendments are introduced as per the changing situations or as per will of the people. Through this creation, a powerful nation, known as the Haudenosaunee, or known to Europeans as the Iroquois Nation.

The concept relates to the fact that society is constantly changing and therefore the principals of how the society is run must adapt to the ongoing changes. The late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia discouraged the idea of the living Constitution, declaring that the Constitution should only be understood in the terms of the people. The United States Constitution is founded on the principles of natural law.

This law governs and transcends any political activity is a state theory based on the idea of social contract, the people are the source and basis of the authority of the rulers. The Constitution defines the principles of a federation that recognizes both levels of government based on the separation and balance of powers and the division of responsibilities between the federal state foreign policy, defense, foreign trade. The exploration of creating a new government with the United States Constitution, led to encounter other constitutions.

This encounter affected how the government will run by the rights people have, the laws that were made, and the branches. The fundamental principles that define how a country or an organization should be governed by its leaders are termed as a constitution. A constitution lays out the laws of the land and differentiates what is legal from illegal activities. It underlines the rights of the citizens and creates measures to protect their rights.

A constitution can be a single document or a set of legal documents. It comprises acts, articles, parts, amendments, and more. One of the examples of a constitution is the U. It originally comprised of seven articles.

Were reflective essay editor for hire ca you uneasy

They strive to help America understand that politics driven by religion. Technically no. Nowhere is it listed in his duties to follow the wishes of the public. Yet to more successfully fulfill his duties, public support is required. The president is not obligated to follow public opinion while in office, but he should always take it into account to.

The president is not obligated to follow public opinion as outlined in the Constitution. The job and the duties. On that day he changed many opinions and views, in the matter of five minutes. He proved that we, the American people have the power to change a nation through our words. Not only can we change the world with our voice, but we can change the world through our actions.

Protests and gatherings have impacted the United States civilization as we know it. Our freedom of speech and the freedom to associate ourselves with who we please has helped the United States nation grow in development and tolerance. Separation of church and state refers to the division of the relationship between religion and government. Various laws apply to different countries around the world about the separation of church and state.

Some involve religion so much into their daily lives; it controls how their country is run. In other places, where it is not mandated as much, it becomes a problem in disputing what is and what is not right. The United States of America faces this issue as they struggle deciding what the meaning. Throughout the article, Sarokin implies that many decisions made by the judges are not necessarily decisions that would be made based off the Constitution as it should be, but based off the judges giving into the majorities opinions and desires.

Sarokin expressed how it takes resilience and loyalty to follow the Constitution and to make decisions. The United States Supreme Court receives many appeals, but it hears and rules on a small percentage of cases each year. Numerous factors influence the actions of the court, both in deciding to hear a case and in the decisions it hands down.

Define Judicial Review- The power of the courts authority to review the actions of the executive and legislative branch and to invalidate if their actions are contrary to the constitutional principles. The Judicial Review upholds the national law. The Constitution of the United States has not always been the establishment of our government. Numerous issues including limited Congressional powers and no singular leader for the country contributed to the formation of our current constitution.

However, in order for the constitution to be adapted as the new. The Constitution of the United States is a carefully thought and written document. Constitution is very important to anyone one who lives in the United States or who has come to live in the United States to understand.

I do not think that this is the case, simply because, it is not something that to everyone is common knowledge. Constitution is not written in a manner that everyone can understand it. I believe for something of such great proportion and meaning should be easily attainable, understood and explained. This is how the U. Constitution begins. These things written above, I do not believe have been fulfilled in their entirety. I do not feel that they will be able to be filled completely because the United States then, is not the United States now.

In , when the U. Constitution became fully operational, the population then compared to now was extremely lower. To me that makes it seem utterly impossible to use a document that was ratified by not fifty states that didn't all even technically exist but only nine. The difference in the population in itself seems reason enough to revise and-or reconsider our Constitution.

I found a very interesting site that provided me with very extensive information about the U. It contained a section for questions and answers relating to the Constitution, one question that caught my eye were, "From what classes or society were the members of the Constitutional Convention drawn?

The Confederates want many of the things the constitution has to offer, along with the views and opinions that they share amongst themselves. The first thing that caught my attention was the first thing I read, the preamble. The similarities and differences between the U.

In my opinion the U. Though differences and arguments still arise throughout the U. I, like the majority of Americans from the poll, agree in that we feel the U. I agree with the Constitution being a living document, but not because the founders intended it that way. All of the flaws that Levinson found in the Constitution prove true to me.

Politics is hardly about what's best for the people anymore, and has turned into a childish game of "my party is better than yours. The separation of powers began its life in with the creation of the U. S Constitution.

The separation of powers could be argued to be the most important aspect of the U. S Constitution along with Federalism. The U. K constitution in contrast to that of the U. S operates on the basis of a "fusion" of powers whereby the House of Commons holds the most power. As a result of the codified U. S constitution it offers a rigid and organised structure, which provides clarity and stability.

The separation of powers in my opinion is the most important element in the U. S constitution as I I am satisfied with my research and now my last question that needs to be answered is what are other student's views on drug testing for employment. When I compare my own country to the U. S, I do not have to have read books or taken lessons to know that America is a highly religious country, and has been since its earliest days.

Furthermore, my notion of being "highly religious" was intensified when I spent a year in the U.

HOW TO FORM A RESUME

It was to determine if the United States government had the capability to create a bank in Maryland and if Maryland was able to tax the government for this decision. In the end, the Supreme court ruled that federal government has the ability to pass laws that are not expressed in the Constitution. This allocation was possible through the Necessary and Proper Clause listed in Article 1 Section 8 of the Constitution.

In its efforts it tries to transfer power that the federal government encompasses back to the states. The Devolution Revolution was started by the Reagan Administration due to past issues where the federal government was not adequate to make decisions. It was the efforts to slow down the power of the federal government and give back numerous powers and responsibilities back to the states. Since , the United States has addressed issues of federalism by utilizing the principles of the Constitution, more specifically the power of the branches of government.

What the Constitution claims about such powers should be the primary influence in federalism. For example, some Florida laws may seem stupid to someone living in Pennsylvania. However, that state most likely imposed those laws for a specific reason.

Federalism and Congressional powers are central to state or federal powers. If some form of agreement is not made on the part, there will be issues within that state. Public policy tries to enforce social laws that are generally unwritten, however, understood nonetheless. If these two powers cannot agree upon such social laws, then numerous issues will come of it.

That is why, for example, all states must have a drinking age of 21, even if some states feel that this should be changed. It is agreed upon. That is, because I do not feel that states should unit and form a central authority. I feel this would cause more problems in the long run. The term federalist has changed increasingly since its origin to todays times, back then a federalist was an individual who supported the constitution and were committed to a much looser decentralized form of government.

Liberals and Conservatives views of federalism differ from those of liberals and conservatives during the 18th and 19th century. During these times, the federalist was regarded with high respect and in high regard, however, today these views are not the same.

Liberals and conservatives believe that big government ought to live up to their promises as well as have the citizens safety and best interest in mind. However, many discrepancies have arisen between the government and their responsibilities to citizens, and many believe they have personal interest at heart. In the Wickard v. Filburn case, the Supreme court significantly increased the regulating authority of the federal government.

Conservatives feel that it is our personal responsibility to provide ourselves with healthcare and believe in a limited form of government. However, liberals believe it is the governments duty to provide us with equality and to alleviate us of social ills. These two differ quite extensively, however, the liberals were more in favor of the rulings of Wickhard v.

Filburn because it placed responsibility more so on the federal government rather than self. Some of the pros would include: protection against tyranny, diffusing power, more efficiency, and conflict management. Some of the cons associated with it include: advocated inequalities between states, blockage of Nationalist policies by the state, and racing to the bottom.

In my opinion, this duty should be granted by the national government. I feel that if states were granted such responsibilities, there would be little consistency in the matter. I think that it is the best interest of the national government to demise a plan of immigrant reform. In the end, consistency is key, it would be much simpler to have the national government handle such issues, since they have been the ones responsible for such issues historically.

Question 2 a. The primary motives and assumptions of the framers of the constitution was to establish an effective government. One that was built for the people and would enable the nation to grow and change as well. It was to fix the issues known previously, and also had emphasis on core values such as liberty, equality, and democracy. They were under the assumption that the constitution would be built on such core beliefs and be a good representation of rights each American deserves.

Some of the most important values built into the American political system of today are very similar to the values the founders believed in. In modern times, the political system is concerned with liberty, equality, and property. As we can see, the ideas of liberty and equality have remained the same from earlier times until more modern days. Democracy is the leading difference.

The founders were more concerned with democracy within their political arena than individuals are today. I think the reason for this is because many feel their opinions and votes do not matter. Not to mention that when voting, its generally the choice between the lesser of two evils. A constitutional democracy is a system within the government that ultimately has a very well-defined limitations set on political authorities.

Constitutionalism is strict adherence to the principles within the constitution. Madison, as you presumably know, saw the wickedness in human instinct, yet in the meantime observed temperance too. He trusted that the legislature would be the genuine impression of the general population it spoke to and it must not fit in with the disasters of human instinct. Along these lines, consequently, his perspectives of human instinct influenced his hypothesis in government by constraining the energy of the legislature to anticipate defilement.

His theory is represented in ideas of democracy because him as well as other framers wanted a republican democracy. Self-interest was also a vastly debated argument of these individuals as well. Economic conditions also impacted democracy significantly as well. One major area of division at the time of the constitutional convention was between smaller and larger states. The smaller states felt that every state, regardless of size should have the same amount of congress representatives.

However, the larger states felt that with having a larger population, they should be granted more representatives. It was resolved by having a singular house of congress, and representatives are based on population. With each state being granted at least one representative and each state was to have at least two senators no matter what its population was.

There were three compromises that were necessary prior to ratifying the constitution. These included: Great Compromise Connecticut compromise , the three-fifths compromise, and the trade compromise. Equality within the Constitution is found within the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments.

The 13th is designated to abolish slavery. The 14th allowed freed slaves to be citizens of the United States. And lastly, the 15th amendment allowed the right to vote to any man of any race. Marbury v. Madison created judicial review in the government system. Judicial review is basically the power allocated to federal courts to proclaim legislative and executive acts unconstitutional.

It was highly significant, and the constitution claimed it to be the supreme law of the land. This case was highly important when decided because it was actually the first Supreme court case to apply ideas of judicial review. It allowed federal courts to ultimately void any act of Congress that were in opposition to the constitution.

It fully placed the constitutions ideas in place. The development of democracy was also influenced by this case. Daniel Stid considers the different factors, chiefly political polarization, that have led Congress to abdicate so many of its powers to the President, and explores a number of reforms that could help restore the Congress that Madison envisioned.

Michael Stokes Paulsen discusses Madison's views toward constitutional interpretation, which he viewed as equally the province of each branch of government, not just the courts, and believed must follow the text of the Constitution as originally understood. Jack Rakove explores one of Madison's ideas that was not adopted by the Constitutional Convention: a "council of revision" including the President and the Supreme Court that would address constitutional problems with laws passed by Congress.

Colleen Sheehan contends that, while Madison did seek to prevent "tyranny of the majority," he also wanted to empower national majorities to govern wisely. But advances in technology and increased polarization have undermined the "deliberative Republic" Madison envisioned. Greg Weiner says that Madison believed in the sovereignty of public opinion but that true public sentiment forms gradually through deliberation, giving time for passions to cool.

Modern advances in technology have undermined this vision, as public opinion now forms almost instantaneously. Templeton, Jr. Essay Series. Introduction Introduction: A Madisonian Constitution for All by Michael Gerhardt, Scholar-in-residence, National Constitution Center, and Jeffrey Rosen, President and CEO, National Constitution Center Michael Gerhardt and Jeffrey Rosen take a look at the scholars participating in this essay series and how they offer insights on the Madisonian Constitution, the likely developments undermining its objectives, and possible solutions for its restoration.

You esl dissertation conclusion ghostwriting website for masters for the