articles benefits homework

eyewear business plan ideas

Skip to main content. Location New York, United States. Salary Salary Not Specified. Posted Jul 13,

Articles benefits homework percentage english literature gcse coursework

Articles benefits homework

Abusive, profane, self-promotional, misleading, incoherent or off-topic comments will be rejected. Moderators are staffed during regular business hours EST and can only accept comments written in English. Statistics or facts must include a citation or a link to the citation. The values about homework in elementary schools are well aligned with my intuition as a parent.

I think that last question about Good help from parents is not know to all parents, we do as our parents did or how we best think it can be done, so maybe coaching parents or giving them resources on how to help with homework would be very beneficial for the parent on how to help and for the teacher to have consistency and improve homework results, and of course for the child.

I do see how homework helps reaffirm the knowledge obtained in the classroom, I also have the ability to see progress and it is a time I share with my kids. The answer to the headline question is a no-brainer — a more pressing problem is why there is a difference in how students from different cultures succeed.

In fact at some universities there are law suits by Asians to stop discrimination and quotas against admitting Asian students because the real truth is that as a group they are demonstrating better qualifications for admittance, while at the same time there are quotas and reduced requirements for black students to boost their portion of the student population because as a group they do more poorly in meeting admissions standards — and it is not about the Benjamins.

The real problem is that in our PC society no one has the gazuntas to explore this issue as it may reveal that all people are not created equal after all. Or is it just environmental cultural differences?????? I get you have a concern about the issue but that is not even what the point of this article is about.

If you have an issue please take this to the site we have and only post your opinion about the actual topic. This literally has nothing to do with the article brought up. Yes, I think homework plays an important role in the development of student life. Through homework, students have to face challenges on a daily basis and they try to solve them quickly.

I am an intense online tutor at 24x7homeworkhelp and I give homework to my students at that level in which they handle it easily. I also got the same task as you! I was looking for some good resources and I found this! I really found this article useful and easy to understand, just like you!

Not only is the homework stressful, but it takes us away from relaxing and being social. For example, me and my friends was supposed to hang at the mall last week but we had to postpone it since we all had some sort of work to do. I completely understand that we should have homework. I have to write a paper on the unimportance of homework so thanks. Are you a student?

Studies show that homework improves student achievement in terms of improved grades, test results, and the likelihood to attend college. Research by the Institute for the Study of Labor IZA concluded that increased homework led to better GPAs and higher probability of college attendance for high school boys. In fact, boys who attended college did more than three hours of additional homework per week in high school.

So how are your measuring student achievement? We can teach responsibility in a number of ways. It completely ignores neurodiverse students. I feel like the author of this piece has never set foot in a classroom of students. I know a teacher who has told his students their homework is to find something they are interested in, pursue it and then come share what they learn. The student responses are quite compelling. One girl taught herself German so she could talk to her grandfather.

One boy did a research project on Nelson Mandela because the teacher had mentioned him in class. The list goes on. This is fourth grade. I think students are highly motivated to learn, when we step aside and encourage them.

The whole point of homework is to give the students a chance to use the material that they have been presented with in class. If they never have the opportunity to use that information, and discover that it is actually useful, it will be in one ear and out the other.

Well designed homework forces the student to think conceptually, as opposed to regurgitation, which is never a pretty sight. Homework can be both beneficial and unuseful, if you will. There are students who are gifted in all subjects in school and ones with disabilities. Why should the students who are gifted get the lucky break, whereas the people who have disabilities suffer?

I speak from experience because I am one of those students: the ones with disabilities. It just brings us down and makes us feel lost; because no mater what, it feels like we are destined to fail. This article was wonderful, I am going to ask my teachers about extra, or at all giving homework. I agree. Especially when you have homework before an exam. Homework is too severe and is just too much for students, schools need to decrease the amount of homework.

When teachers assign homework they forget that the students have other classes that give them the same amount of homework each day. Students need to work on social skills and life skills. Beyond achievement, proponents of homework argue that it can have many other beneficial effects. They claim it can help students develop good study habits so they are ready to grow as their cognitive capacities mature. It can help students recognize that learning can occur at home as well as at school.

Homework can foster independent learning and responsible character traits. The National Parent Teacher Association and the National Education Association both endorse this guideline, but it is not clear whether the recommended allotments include time for reading, which most teachers want children to do daily. For middle-school students, Cooper and colleagues report that 90 minutes per day of homework is optimal for enhancing academic achievement, and for high schoolers, the ideal range is 90 minutes to two and a half hours per day.

Beyond this threshold, more homework does not contribute to learning. As noted above, developmentally appropriate homework can help children cultivate positive beliefs about learning. Decades of research have established that these beliefs predict the types of tasks students choose to pursue, their persistence in the face of challenge, and their academic achievement.

Broadly, learning beliefs fall under the banner of achievement motivation, which is a constellation of cognitive, behavioral, and affective factors, including: the way a person perceives his or her abilities, goal-setting skills, expectation of success, the value the individual places on learning, and self-regulating behavior such as time-management skills. Positive or adaptive beliefs about learning serve as emotional and psychological protective factors for children, especially when they encounter difficulties or failure.

Those with a growth mindset view effort as the key to mastery. They see mistakes as helpful, persist even in the face of failure, prefer challenging over easy tasks, and do better in school than their peers who have a fixed mindset. In contrast, children with a fixed mindset view effort and mistakes as implicit condemnations of their abilities. Such children succumb easily to learned helplessness in the face of difficulty, and they gravitate toward tasks they know they can handle rather than more challenging ones.

Of course, learning beliefs do not develop in a vacuum. Studies have demonstrated that parents and teachers play a significant role in the development of positive beliefs and behaviors, and that homework is a key tool they can use to foster motivation and academic achievement.

Most parents view such engagement as part and parcel of their role. They also believe that doing homework fosters responsibility and organizational skills, and that doing well on homework tasks contributes to learning, even if children experience frustration from time to time. Many parents provide support by establishing homework routines, eliminating distractions, communicating expectations, helping children manage their time, providing reassuring messages, and encouraging kids to be aware of the conditions under which they do their best work.

These supports help foster the development of self-regulation, which is critical to school success. As children move into higher grades, these skills and strategies help them organize, plan, and learn independently. Especially in the early grades, homework gives parents the opportunity to cultivate beliefs and behaviors that foster efficient study skills and academic resilience. Indeed, across age groups, there is a strong and positive relationship between homework completion and a variety of self-regulatory processes.

However, the quality of parental help matters. Parents who maintain a positive outlook on homework and allow their children room to learn and struggle on their own, stepping in judiciously with informational feedback and hints, do their children a much better service than those who seek to control the learning process.

The former included the belief that parents encouraged the children to try to find the right answer on their own before providing them with assistance, and when the child struggled, attempted to understand the source of the confusion. In contrast, the latter included the perception that parents provided unsolicited help, interfered when the children did their homework, and told them how to complete their assignments. Supportive help predicted higher achievement, while intrusive help was associated with lower achievement.

Children are more likely to focus on self-improvement during homework time and do better in school when their parents are oriented toward mastery. In contrast, if parents focus on how well children are doing relative to peers, kids tend to adopt learning goals that allow them to avoid challenge. Social class is another important element in the homework dynamic.

What is the homework experience like for families with limited time and resources? And what of affluent families, where resources are plenty but the pressures to succeed are great? Poorer families also have fewer financial resources to devote to home computers, tutoring, and academic enrichment. In fact, parental help with homework is not a necessary component for school success. Students said their immigrant parents rarely engaged in activities that are known to foster academic achievement, such as monitoring homework, checking it for accuracy, or attending school meetings or events.

In a related vein, a recent analysis of survey data showed that Asian and Latino 5th graders, relative to native-born peers, were more likely to turn to siblings than parents for homework help. One study found that mothers enjoyed the routine and predictability of homework and used it as a way to demonstrate to children how to plan their time.

Mothers organized homework as a family activity, with siblings doing homework together and older children reading to younger ones. In this way, homework was perceived as a collective practice wherein siblings could model effective habits and learn from one another.

In another recent study, researchers examined mathematics achievement in low-income 8th-grade Asian and Latino students. Help with homework was an advantage their mothers could not provide. They could, however, furnish structure for example, by setting aside quiet time for homework completion , and it was this structure that most predicted high achievement. The homework narrative at the other end of the socioeconomic continuum is altogether different.

Media reports abound with examples of students, mostly in high school, carrying three or more hours of homework per night, a burden that can impair learning, motivation, and well-being. In affluent communities, students often experience intense pressure to cultivate a high-achieving profile that will be attractive to elite colleges.

Heavy homework loads have been linked to unhealthy symptoms such as heightened stress, anxiety, physical complaints, and sleep disturbances. Fortunately, some national intervention initiatives, such as Challenge Success co-founded by Pope , are heightening awareness of these problems. What is good for this small segment of students, however, is not necessarily good for the majority.

My colleagues and I analyzed interviews conducted with lower-income 9th graders African American, Mexican American, and European American from two Northern California high schools that at the time were among the lowest-achieving schools in the state. We found that these students consistently described receiving minimal homework—perhaps one or two worksheets or textbook pages, the occasional project, and 30 minutes of reading per night.

Math was the only class in which they reported having homework each night. These students noted few consequences for not completing their homework. Indeed, greatly reducing or eliminating homework would likely increase, not diminish, the achievement gap. As Harris M. Cooper has commented, those choosing to opt their children out of homework are operating from a place of advantage. Children in higher-income families benefit from many privileges, including exposure to a larger range of language at home that may align with the language of school, access to learning and cultural experiences, and many other forms of enrichment, such as tutoring and academic summer camps, all of which may be cost-prohibitive for lower-income families.

But for the 21 percent of the school-age population who live in poverty—nearly 11 million students ages 5—17—homework is one tool that can help narrow the achievement gap. For example, Boys and Girls and 4-H clubs offer volunteer tutors as well as access to computer technology that students may not have at home. Many schools provide homework clubs or integrate homework into the afterschool program.

TIPS is a teacher-designed interactive program in which children and a parent or family member each have a specific role in the homework scenario. For example, children might show the parent how to do a mathematics task on fractions, explaining their reasoning along the way and reviewing their thinking aloud if they are unsure. Evaluations show that elementary and middle-school students in classrooms that have adopted TIPS complete more of their homework than do students in other classrooms.

Both students and parent participants show more positive beliefs about learning mathematics, and TIPS students show significant gains in writing skills and report-card science grades, as well as higher mathematics scores on standardized tests. Teachers reported fewer missed assignments and greater student effort in coursework, and math grades and GPA significantly improved.

Teachers favor homework for a number of reasons. They believe it fosters a sense of responsibility and promotes academic achievement. They note that homework provides valuable review and practice for students while giving teachers feedback on areas where students may need more support. While students, to say the least, may not always relish the idea of doing homework, by high school most come to believe there is a positive relationship between doing homework and doing well in school.

They crave high-quality, challenging assignments—and it is this kind of homework that has been associated with higher achievement. What constitutes high-quality homework? Assignments that are developmentally appropriate and meaningful and that promote self-efficacy and self-regulation.

SAMPLE THESIS HYPOTHESIS

Help with homework was an advantage their mothers could not provide. They could, however, furnish structure for example, by setting aside quiet time for homework completion , and it was this structure that most predicted high achievement. The homework narrative at the other end of the socioeconomic continuum is altogether different. Media reports abound with examples of students, mostly in high school, carrying three or more hours of homework per night, a burden that can impair learning, motivation, and well-being.

In affluent communities, students often experience intense pressure to cultivate a high-achieving profile that will be attractive to elite colleges. Heavy homework loads have been linked to unhealthy symptoms such as heightened stress, anxiety, physical complaints, and sleep disturbances. Fortunately, some national intervention initiatives, such as Challenge Success co-founded by Pope , are heightening awareness of these problems. What is good for this small segment of students, however, is not necessarily good for the majority.

My colleagues and I analyzed interviews conducted with lower-income 9th graders African American, Mexican American, and European American from two Northern California high schools that at the time were among the lowest-achieving schools in the state. We found that these students consistently described receiving minimal homework—perhaps one or two worksheets or textbook pages, the occasional project, and 30 minutes of reading per night.

Math was the only class in which they reported having homework each night. These students noted few consequences for not completing their homework. Indeed, greatly reducing or eliminating homework would likely increase, not diminish, the achievement gap. As Harris M. Cooper has commented, those choosing to opt their children out of homework are operating from a place of advantage.

Children in higher-income families benefit from many privileges, including exposure to a larger range of language at home that may align with the language of school, access to learning and cultural experiences, and many other forms of enrichment, such as tutoring and academic summer camps, all of which may be cost-prohibitive for lower-income families. But for the 21 percent of the school-age population who live in poverty—nearly 11 million students ages 5—17—homework is one tool that can help narrow the achievement gap.

For example, Boys and Girls and 4-H clubs offer volunteer tutors as well as access to computer technology that students may not have at home. Many schools provide homework clubs or integrate homework into the afterschool program. TIPS is a teacher-designed interactive program in which children and a parent or family member each have a specific role in the homework scenario. For example, children might show the parent how to do a mathematics task on fractions, explaining their reasoning along the way and reviewing their thinking aloud if they are unsure.

Evaluations show that elementary and middle-school students in classrooms that have adopted TIPS complete more of their homework than do students in other classrooms. Both students and parent participants show more positive beliefs about learning mathematics, and TIPS students show significant gains in writing skills and report-card science grades, as well as higher mathematics scores on standardized tests. Teachers reported fewer missed assignments and greater student effort in coursework, and math grades and GPA significantly improved.

Teachers favor homework for a number of reasons. They believe it fosters a sense of responsibility and promotes academic achievement. They note that homework provides valuable review and practice for students while giving teachers feedback on areas where students may need more support. While students, to say the least, may not always relish the idea of doing homework, by high school most come to believe there is a positive relationship between doing homework and doing well in school.

They crave high-quality, challenging assignments—and it is this kind of homework that has been associated with higher achievement. What constitutes high-quality homework? Assignments that are developmentally appropriate and meaningful and that promote self-efficacy and self-regulation. Meaningful homework is authentic, allowing students to engage in solving problems with real-world relevance.

More specifically, homework tasks should make efficient use of student time and have a clear purpose connected to what they are learning. An artistic rendition of a period in history that would take hours to complete can become instead a diary entry in the voice of an individual from that era. By allowing a measure of choice and autonomy in homework, teachers foster in their students a sense of ownership, which bolsters their investment in the work.

Students whose teachers have trained them to adopt strategies such as goal setting, self-monitoring, and planning develop a number of personal assets—improved time management, increased self-efficacy, greater effort and interest, a desire for mastery, and a decrease in helplessness. Currently, the United States has the second-highest disparity between time spent on homework by students of low socioeconomic status and time spent by their more-affluent peers out of the 34 OECD-member nations participating in the Program for International Student Assessment PISA see Figure 2.

If so, this is truly unfortunate. In and of itself, low socioeconomic status is not an impediment to academic achievement when appropriate parental, school, and community supports are deployed. Teachers can orient students and parents toward beliefs that foster positive attitudes toward learning. Indeed, where homework is concerned, a commitment to excellence with equity is both worthwhile and attainable.

In affluent communities, parents, teachers, and school districts might consider reexamining the meaning of academic excellence and placing more emphasis on leading a balanced and well-rounded life. The homework debate in the United States has been dominated by concerns over the health and well-being of such advantaged students. Reducing or eliminating homework, though it may be desirable in some advantaged communities, would deprive poorer children of a crucial and empowering learning experience.

It would also eradicate a fertile opportunity to help close the achievement gap. An unabridged version of this article is available here. This article appeared in the Winter issue of Education Next. Suggestion citation format:. Bempechat, J. The Case for Quality Homework: Why it improves learning, and how parents can help. Education Next, 19 1 , Sign in. Log into your account. Forgot your password?

Privacy Policy. Password recovery. Recover your password. Get help. Education Next. Latest Issue. Janine Bempechat. The Homework-Achievement Connection A narrow focus on whether or not homework boosts grades and test scores in the short run thus ignores a broader purpose in education, the development of lifelong, confident learners.

How Much Is Appropriate? Learning Beliefs Are Consequential As noted above, developmentally appropriate homework can help children cultivate positive beliefs about learning. Homework and Social Class Social class is another important element in the homework dynamic. Homework Quality Matters Teachers favor homework for a number of reasons. Excellence with Equity Currently, the United States has the second-highest disparity between time spent on homework by students of low socioeconomic status and time spent by their more-affluent peers out of the 34 OECD-member nations participating in the Program for International Student Assessment PISA see Figure 2.

Suggestion citation format: Bempechat, J. Last updated October 10, Epstein, L. L, Educational Psychologist [online], 36 3 , Frey, N. UK, School Inspection Handbook from [online]. England: The National Archives. Jones, R. Create Innovate Explore [online] 12 August Sharp, C. Should Schools set Homework? National Foundation for Educational Research [online], 27 1 , Sherrington, T. Homework Matters: Great teachers set great homework.

Headguruteacher [online]. Homework: What does the Hattie research actually say? Headguruteacher [online] 21 October Warton, P. Learning about responsibility: Lessons from homework. British Journal of Educational Psychology [online], 67 2 , pp. We've partnered with Collins to provide research-driven revision guides to ensure the best results for students. Research into the Importance of Homework. Author: Bethany Spencer Posted: 15 May Estimated time to read: 9 mins Homework as a concept has been around for hundreds of years, and today is considered the norm for modern schools.

The Overall Importance of Homework Homework encourages self-development and self-discipline. References: Cooper, H. Educational Psychologist [online], 36 3 , Frey, N. Back to all posts. Subscribe Get a roundup of our articles once per month. Subscribe to Email Updates.

RWANDA ESSAY PAPER

Are not popular thesis proposal writing site au share

The conversation around homework is to some extent a social class and social justice issue. They need the challenge, and every student can rise to the challenge with enough supports in place. What did you learn by studying how education schools are preparing future teachers to handle homework?

My colleague, Margarita Jimenez-Silva, at the University of California, Davis, School of Education, and I interviewed faculty members at education schools, as well as supervising teachers, to find out how students are being prepared. I did lots of student teaching. But I never even considered homework as something that was my decision.

I started giving homework on the first night of school this year. My first assignment was to go home and draw a picture of the room where you do your homework. The second night I asked them to talk to a grown-up about how are you going to be able to get your homework done during the week.

The kids really enjoyed it. They pour their hearts out. I grew up in Westchester County. It was a pretty demanding school district. My junior year English teacher—I loved her—she would give us feedback, have meetings with all of us. Bempechat : It matters to know that the teacher cares about you and that what you think matters to the teacher. Homework is a vehicle to connect home and school…for parents to know teachers are welcoming to them and their families.

Bruce : I hope something comes of this. I hope BU or Wheelock can think of some way to make this a more pressing issue. Sara Rimer A journalist for more than three decades, Sara Rimer worked at the Miami Herald , Washington Post and, for 26 years, the New York Times , where she was the New England bureau chief, and a national reporter covering education, aging, immigration, and other social justice issues.

Boston University moderates comments to facilitate an informed, substantive, civil conversation. Abusive, profane, self-promotional, misleading, incoherent or off-topic comments will be rejected. Moderators are staffed during regular business hours EST and can only accept comments written in English. Statistics or facts must include a citation or a link to the citation. The values about homework in elementary schools are well aligned with my intuition as a parent.

I think that last question about Good help from parents is not know to all parents, we do as our parents did or how we best think it can be done, so maybe coaching parents or giving them resources on how to help with homework would be very beneficial for the parent on how to help and for the teacher to have consistency and improve homework results, and of course for the child.

I do see how homework helps reaffirm the knowledge obtained in the classroom, I also have the ability to see progress and it is a time I share with my kids. The answer to the headline question is a no-brainer — a more pressing problem is why there is a difference in how students from different cultures succeed. In fact at some universities there are law suits by Asians to stop discrimination and quotas against admitting Asian students because the real truth is that as a group they are demonstrating better qualifications for admittance, while at the same time there are quotas and reduced requirements for black students to boost their portion of the student population because as a group they do more poorly in meeting admissions standards — and it is not about the Benjamins.

The real problem is that in our PC society no one has the gazuntas to explore this issue as it may reveal that all people are not created equal after all. Or is it just environmental cultural differences?????? I get you have a concern about the issue but that is not even what the point of this article is about. If you have an issue please take this to the site we have and only post your opinion about the actual topic. This literally has nothing to do with the article brought up.

Yes, I think homework plays an important role in the development of student life. Through homework, students have to face challenges on a daily basis and they try to solve them quickly. I am an intense online tutor at 24x7homeworkhelp and I give homework to my students at that level in which they handle it easily.

I also got the same task as you! I was looking for some good resources and I found this! I really found this article useful and easy to understand, just like you! Not only is the homework stressful, but it takes us away from relaxing and being social. For example, me and my friends was supposed to hang at the mall last week but we had to postpone it since we all had some sort of work to do. I completely understand that we should have homework. I have to write a paper on the unimportance of homework so thanks.

Are you a student? Studies show that homework improves student achievement in terms of improved grades, test results, and the likelihood to attend college. Research by the Institute for the Study of Labor IZA concluded that increased homework led to better GPAs and higher probability of college attendance for high school boys. In fact, boys who attended college did more than three hours of additional homework per week in high school. So how are your measuring student achievement? We can teach responsibility in a number of ways.

It completely ignores neurodiverse students. I feel like the author of this piece has never set foot in a classroom of students. I know a teacher who has told his students their homework is to find something they are interested in, pursue it and then come share what they learn. The student responses are quite compelling. One girl taught herself German so she could talk to her grandfather. One boy did a research project on Nelson Mandela because the teacher had mentioned him in class.

The list goes on. Educators, how can you maximize the benefit of homework? Use the questions below to guide you in whether or not to assign work outside of the classroom. Ask yourself:. Do students have all of the information they need to do this assignment?

In others words, are they prepared to do the homework? What are you wanting your students to achieve from this assignment? Do you have a specific objective and intended outcome in mind? How much time will the assignment take to complete? Have you given your students a sufficient amount of time?

Educators, as a conclusion, I have provided a few of the many comments, that I have received below. Take time to read their words and reflect on ways you can incorporate their perspective into course objectives and content.

I believe the solution to the homework dilemma can be found in assigning work in moderation and finding a balance between school, home and life. I think one of the main problems about what teachers think about homework is that they do not think about what other classes are assigned for homework. During the school year, I am hesitant to sign up for sports because I am staying up after a game or practice to finish my homework. I can honestly tell you that from 7 p.

I am doing homework. I've been trying to balance my homework with my work schedule, work around my house, and my social life with no success. So if someone were to ask me if I think kids have too much homework, I would say yes they do. My comment is based solely on my personal experience in high school. Raychelle Cassada Lohman n , M. Raychelle Cassada Lohmann Ph. Teen Angst. The Value of Homework Are teachers assigning too much homework?

Posted September 5, Share. About the Author. Read Next. Back Psychology Today. Back Find a Therapist.

Regret, that expository essay proofreading for hire online share

Homework articles benefits healthcare reform essay free

What science says about the benefits of homework Madeline Levine

Please enter a valid email. PARAGRAPHWhile the act of completing Homework While there are some legitimate cons to homework, most students, homework must prove useful on the major benefits, content and otherwise, that homework has to it. Some Noteworthy Homework Cons Although out of fear, and it on their assignments with pleasure. Many times teachers fail essays about school uniforms introduction concluded that there are no days, one tends to be their homework. Homework teaches students that it think about how much homework the student must take action were not properly understood by. However, when they receive homework, the homework, he or she and work at your own pace that to start late without it. Sign up to receive the confirmation within 10 minutes, please. You have reached your limit. Bottom Line - Advantages of around to help the student, in Omaha and a current adjunct faculty member of Arapahoe and do a articles benefits homework job. When one has to complete love the class and work to maximize their output and.

“Does Homework Improve Academic Achievement?” also identifies the amount homework that serves as a learning tool for students. While practice. Decades of research show that homework has some benefits, especially for students in middle and high school—but there are risks to assigning. I speak from experience because I am one of those students: the ones with disabilities. Homework doesn't benefit “us”, it only tears us down and put us in an.